Luncheon Meat


Luncheon meat is a great bait which can be bought from any supermarket, lasts for ages in its tin and is great for catching barbel, carp & tench. Its meaty oily texture helps attract fish and usually accounts for above average sized fish. It can be used as small cubes on small hooks for smaller fish, or larger irregular sized pieces on bigger hooks for much larger fish.


Casting any distance with luncheon meat can be problematic, so it's usually a bait which is best employed at short to medium ranges.




You can however increase the toughness of the meat by frying slices of it the night before fishing to produce a more robust texture.


Many different flavourings and colourings can be added to luncheon meant to improve its fish pulling power, like everything with flavours experimentation is the key. Below is a small guide on how to flavour & colour luncheon meat.



Flavouring


A simple and effective way of flavouring meat is to do so the night before you go fishing, all you need is a freezer bag, tin of luncheon meat and your chosen flavourings. This can really give an edge on pressured waters where fish see normal luncheon meat on a regular basis. A simple guide below shows just how easy it is to do.



Cut the luncheon meat up in to your desired sizes. Place the cubes within a freezer bag and add the flavourings or colourings you require - for this guide, turmeric & curry powder have been added to give the meat a spicy kick.




Now blow air into the bag and shake for at least 30 seconds to ensure the meat is fully coated. With the meat coated, expel the air from the bag, seal & then place in a fridge over night so it can absorb more flavour.

How To Hook




Luncheon meat directly on the hook is best used for short distance rod & pole fishing - casting distances further than 30ft increases the chances of the meat coming off during the cast. Hair rigged meat is a great way of securing luncheon meat for casting medium to long distances.




Try using a different shape instead of the standard cube by tearing lumps off, this can sometimes fool wary fish who have become accustomed to the standard cube. Meat coils attached to a hair secure luncheon meat very firmly by their design, this enables meat to be cast longer distances and remain intact when fishing rivers with a strong current.